Medallion Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II by Mary Gillick, 1952. Courtesy the Estate of Ernest and Mary Gillick and Leeds Museums & Galleries (Leeds Art Gallery)
Medallion Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II by Mary Gillick, 1952. Courtesy the Estate of Ernest and Mary Gillick and Leeds Museums & Galleries (Leeds Art Gallery)

‘Mary Gillick: Her Art in your Pocket’ exhibition

Venue: Henry Moore Institute, Leeds

Dates: 20 Sep 2017 – 28 January 2018

Seminar: Mary Gillick and the making of medallic sculpture in twentieth-century Britain, Saturday, 18 November 2017, programme here >>

 

This display is the first dedicated to Gillick’s sculpture, and presents plaster models, drawings and photographs showing her working processes for the production of coins, medals and portrait reliefs.

 

Trained as a sculptor at Nottingham School of Art and the Royal College of Art, Mary Gaskell Gillick (née Tutin) (1881-1965) won a competition in 1952 that would see her art in everyone’s pockets: her portrait of Queen Elizabeth II appeared on British and Commonwealth coinage until decimalisation in 1971.

 

Gillick was well-known during her lifetime for her medallic relief work and for the production of memorial portrait plaques for public buildings, but she is most widely remembered for her portrait of Queen Elizabeth II designed for the obverse of British and Commonwealth coinage. Gillick won the commission from a field of seventeen when she was seventy-one years old, recently bereaved and in poor health.

 

From the paper silhouettes Gillick made as a sixteen-year-old in 1897, this exhibition follows the trajectory of her career through the portrait commissions of Lionel Michael Lowry Barnwell (1947), Frederic Anstruther Cardew (1950), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Kathleen Ferrier (1958) from the Sculpture Collection and Archive of Sculptors’ Papers of Leeds Museums and Galleries.

 

Full details of the exhibition here >>

Mary Gillick carving Sir Thomas More for Crosby Hall, 1926. Courtesy the Estate of Mary Gillick and Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Art Gallery)

Mary Gillick carving Sir Thomas More for Crosby Hall, 1926. Courtesy the Estate of Mary Gillick and Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Art Gallery)

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