The Fellowship programme is now in its third year, and builds on the network’s successful Bursary programme enabling museum professionals to significantly enhance their portrait expertise, develop their professional network, and deliver a substantial output to benefit their home collection and its audience. Five new Fellowships were granted in July 2019, with Fellows developing their projects over a twelve-month period. The new Fellows are as follows:

Anna Maria Barry, Museum Research Assistant, Royal College of Music Museum

Musical Portraits in Bohemian London: 1870-1930

Anna Maria Barry, Museum Research Assistant, Royal College of Music Museum

Anna Maria Barry, Museum Research Assistant, Royal College of Music Museum

My project will explore a bohemian social set that came together in London during the period 1870 to 1930. Its members included both artists and musicians. The former group counted Edward Burne-Jones, John Singer Sargent, George Frederic Watts and Lawrence Alma-Tadema amongst its members. In the latter group were celebrity pianists Jan Paderewski and Jacques Blumenthal, baritone Sir George Henschel and conductor Lionel Benson. Members of these groups frequently collaborated, with artists often painting their musical friends. Many of these works have survived at the Royal College of Music Museum, which looks after one of the world’s largest collections of musical portraits.

Taking a small group of these portraits as its focus, this project will research the stories of these paintings and the relationships between their artists and sitters. This will reveal the significant and surprising ways in which members of this important social circle collaborated. Research will be conducted internationally, at the National Museum in Warsaw and the National Library of Scotland. My discoveries will be disseminated through an ambitious programme of engagement activities, including two publications, an interactive digital exhibition and a portrait-making activity for children. A recreation of a bohemian soirée will also be held at the Royal College of Music, featuring performances from some of its students.


Gemma Haigh, Curatorial Assistant, Guildford Museum

The Significance of being Female: Female Sitters in Portraits by John Russell in the Guildford Heritage Services Collection

Gemma Haigh, Curatorial Assistant, Guildford Museum

Gemma Haigh, Curatorial Assistant, Guildford Museum

With a nationally significant collection of over 35 original works in the Guildford collection by eighteenth century artist, John Russell, I will be using this opportunity to research twenty of his female portraits. They are mostly pastels but I will also be examining two oil paintings during the course of the project.

It is my hope that exploring the identities of the female sitters will provide new insight into an under-represented section of eighteenth century society. I also hope that the research will tell us more about Russell as an artist, show us how Russell interacted with women and shed light on his attitudes towards them. I hope that the new information will recommend Guildford as a centre of excellence for the study of John Russell in the future.

Amongst other things, the results of this project will be a display at Guildford House Gallery in 2020 that will celebrate John Russell’s work and an accompanying booklet with information about featured portraits. We will also produce a video to be displayed permanently at the Museum and Gallery, which explains the special preventive conservation needs of pastel pictures.


Imogen Tedbury, Assistant Curator, Royal Holloway, University of London

Portraying Professional Women: Portraits of Principals and Pioneers at Royal Holloway and Bedford New College

I am researching the remarkable portraits of women principals, professors and academic pioneers from the Royal Holloway and Bedford New College art collections https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/about-us/art-collections/

Royal Holloway College and Bedford College were among the first women’s higher education institutions in the UK. Both colleges commissioned portraits of their female leaders from famous society portraitists, including Sir William Orpen, Philip de Laszlo and Francis Dodd. This unique collection of portraits, formed when the two colleges merged in 1985, attest to the colleges’ pride in their principals. They also challenge assumptions about women’s portraiture in the late 19th and early 20th century. I will be researching the portraits’ commission, artists’ practice, and their contemporary reception, display and reproduction, in order to trace intersections between the professionalization of women and modern British portraiture. Research outputs include a new permanent display of the portraits in College, an accompanying catalogue available in print and online, and a short film.


Miranda Terry, Project Officer (Collections), Kingston Lacy, National Trust, Dorset

A closer look: The Kingston Lacy Bone enamels

Miranda Terry, Project Officer (Collections), National Trust, Kingston Lacy

Miranda Terry, Project Officer (Collections), National Trust, Kingston Lacy

My research will focus on a set of Henry Bone enamel portraits in the collection at Kingston Lacy, bought by William John Bankes in the 1830s.

The enamels mostly portray Elizabethan courtiers and are copies of original sixteenth and seventeenth century portraits. Research will help to understand William’s purchase of the enamels and will map them with their preparatory sketches and original portraits, considering their influence on contemporary views of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. A temporary exhibition will focus on a select number of the enamels, where visitors will be able to see them up close, alongside refreshed interpretation.


Gina Warburton, Exhibitions & Collections Assistant, Bury Art Gallery & Sculpture Centre

The Walker Family: Identity and Philanthropy

Gina Warburton, Exhibitions & Collections Assistant, Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre

Gina Warburton, Exhibitions & Collections Assistant, Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre

For this project I shall be researching three newly acquired portraits in Bury Art Museum’s collection by Louise Pierre Spindler which depict Colonel Oliver Ormerod Walker and members of his family. Oliver Walker was a local benefactor, enthusiast and driver of Bury Art Museum’s establishment and the whole family was integral to Bury’s history and local community.

Gifted by direct descendants, I shall use this vital link with the family to interview and record their memories of these paintings and take photographic portraits of them; continuing the tradition of portraiture within the family.

The research will culminate in an exhibition, creative interpretation booklet and the commissioning of new work three contemporary artists. The artists will use this research as inspiration to create new artworks focusing on portraiture – identity, perception, symbolism, philanthropy and patronage – which will be shown during a pop-up event for the local community, volunteers and the direct family; all celebrating a shared heritage.

 



Recent Fellows

Three Professional Research Fellowships were granted in 2017, as follows:

Leeanne Westwood, Museum Curator at Valence House Museum in Dagenham
Leeanne Westwood, Museum Curator, Valence House Museum

Leeanne Westwood, Museum Curator, Valence House Museum

Leeanne is researching the remarkable collection of Fanshawe family portraits, ranging in date from 1560 to 1940, at Valence House Museum. Artists represented include Peter Lely, Marcus Gheeraerts the younger, and Mary Beale. Of particular interest is the presence of contemporary seventeenth-century studio copies of portraits, which can be related to examples in other private and public collections. Leeanne will map these Fanshawe portraits, gaining greater insights into how the family commissioned and displayed replicas.

This research will be presented in a temporary exhibition at Valence House Museum in spring 2018, with accompanying visitor interpretation and booklet.


Catherine Shanahan, Collections Officer at Rugby Art Gallery and Museum
Catherine Shanahan, Collections Officer, Rugby Art Gallery and Museum

Catherine Shanahan, Collections Officer, Rugby Art Gallery and Museum

Catherine is researching the photographic archive of the Redding studio run by Graham Wiseman in Rugby between 1958 and 1972.

Wiseman’s collection of some 25,000 acetate and glass plate negatives record the changing demographics of the town, as economic opportunities attracted migrants from Asia, the Caribbean, and elsewhere. Catherine will identify ten portraits from the collection to be the subject of intensive research, covering the sitters’ biographies and their communities. Her research will also incorporate best practice guidelines around the storage, display, handling, and digitisation of photographic media. Intended outputs include oral recordings with sitters, interpretation material for the Art Gallery and Museum website, and temporary displays for in-gallery use and at community engagement events.


Tom Boggis, Senior Curator at the Holburne Museum in Bath
Tom Boggis, Senior Curator, Holburne Museum

Tom Boggis, Senior Curator, Holburne Museum

Tom’s research is derived from the portrait of Catherine Cussans (1753-1834) by John Hoppner in the Holburne collection.

Cussans was the paternal aunt of Sir William Holburne and Sir William’s collection forms the founding core of the museum. Biographical research is intended to uncover more about Cussans’ own collecting activities, the sources of her wealth which eventually helped to purchase the museum’s home on Great Pulteney Street, and the influence she had in developing her nephew’s collecting interests. Tom will also be researching Hoppner’s practice and oeuvre, in order to reassess his contemporary reception by patrons, critics, and the wider artistic community. The various outputs of this research include new content for the museum’s website, volunteer training, and a revised children’s trail.



Three Professional Research Fellowships were granted in 2016, as follows

Professional Learning Fellow: Su Hepburn, Senior Learning Officer, Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton
Su Hepburn, Senior Learning Officer, Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton

Su Hepburn, Senior Learning Officer, Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton. Professional Learning Fellow 2016/17.

Su researched the life of Frances Garnet Wolseley, Viscountess Wolseley (1872-1936) and her portrait by Julian Russell Story dated 1884.

Wolseley trained female students in the practicalities of garden design and management, formally establishing Glynde College for Lady Gardeners in 1907 and publishing Gardening for Women the following year. She was a life-long advocate of market co-operatives, smallholdings, and the revival of rural industries. Local and national archives, especially the Brighton & Hove Libraries’ Rare Books collection, were consulted to better understand the sitter’s personal and professional biography. This research informed a free online teachers’ resource which enables teachers to explore this portrait and the language of portraiture with their students.


Professional Partnership Fellows: Dr Kate Noble, Education Officer, and Lucy Shipp, Learning Associate – Widening Participation and Arts Award, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
Dr Kate Noble, Education Officer, and Lucy Sercombe, Learning Associate, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Dr Kate Noble, Education Officer, and Lucy Sercombe, Learning Associate, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Professional Research Fellows 2016/17.

Lucy Shipp, Learning Associate - Widening Participation and Arts Award, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Professional Research Fellows 2016/17.

Lucy Shipp, Learning Associate – Widening Participation and Arts Award, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Professional Research Fellows 2016/17.

Kate Noble began this Fellowship with colleague Lucy Sercombe in spring 2016, and after the latter’s departure from the Fitzwilliam Museum in late summer 2016, Kate was joined by Lucy Shipp to complete the Fellowship project.

Kate and Lucy researched the portrait The Twins, Kate and Grace Hoare by John Everett Millais (1829-96), oil on canvas, 1876.

Their research focused on the biographies of the sitters and their contemporary social history and private artistic activities. A further strand of research sought to situate the portrait within Millais’s oeuvre. Anticipated outputs include a short film made by the Fellows, their Fitzwilliam colleagues, and local A’ Level students interpreting the portrait, as well as learning material for teachers and group leaders to use in order to encourage engagement with Victorian portraiture at the museum.


Professional Research Fellow: Laura Millward, Collections Assistant, The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, University of Leeds
Laura Millward, Collections Assistant, The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, University of Leeds

Laura Millward, Collections Assistant, The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, University of Leeds. Professional Research Fellow 2016/17.

Laura researched the pastel portraits of John and Jane Marshall by John Russell, dated 1802.

John Marshall was a successful Leeds industrialist who campaigned for the foundation of a university in the city, and was involved with other public philanthropic causes. His wife Jane was a friend and correspondent of the author Dorothy Wordsworth, sister of William. Laura explored their biographies, social and professional milieu in Leeds, and connections with the portraitist John Russell (1745-1806). Outputs include new in-gallery interpretation and a visitor resource mapping the Marshalls’ contributions to the economic and social life of Leeds.

Watch the 2016 Fellows discussing their research here: